Jan Storms, thoughts

Jan Storms, M.A., is best known for his book Destructieve relaties op de schop - psychopathie herkennen en hanteren (in Dutch; Dismantling Destructive Relationships - Recognizing and Handling Psychopathy) (1st ed. 2010; 2nd ed. 2014) of which more than 30,000 copies have been sold. He gives lectures, courses and training and provides intervision and advice for professionals in (mental) health care, for lawyers and mediators and for people working in the youth protection chain. He gives advice to people who are dealing with a destructive relationship and gives lectures and workshops for these people and their networks. He has performed more than 2,000 family analyses.

Training
Jan Storms' academic study had 'consciousness' as its core subject. He studied psychology, pedagogy, logic, critical assessment of sources (historical criticism) and philosophy of science with a focus on research design at the university level. The study of consciousness is considered a 'first science', the science of knowing, the foundation for all knowledge. His study of the theory of knowledge and its implications for the practice of science and for practical everyday life have proved valuable for his work in the field of psychopathy.

Contribution to research into psychopathy
The history of views on psychopathy is variegated. There was a time when the term 'pychopathies' was used for what are now called personality disorders. The American psychiatrist Hervey Cleckley and - based on Cleckley's study - the Canadian criminologist Robert Hare, described psychopathy as a self-contained disorder. It is widely accepted that psychopathy is characterized by a lack of conscience (self-reflection) and empathy. A characteristic of the various psychopathy constructs is that the criteria for psychopathy are a mixture of essential and non-essential characteristics. The contribution of Jan Storms is that in his formulation of a psychopathy construct he has made a strict separation between core characteristics (necessary and sufficient) and secondary characteristics (non-essential and possibly not sufficient).

The function and risks of loyalty, acceptance and rejection in family relationships
Jan Storms is an expert in the field of (parental) alienation. He gives training to professionals and to parents and family who have to deal with this. He is trained in recognising and differentiating the different forms of alienation and justified rejection (for the sake of protection). He is also an expert in the field of the psychological problems which are often the underlying cause of alienation.

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De gedachten zijn vrij.

Jan Storms, M.A., is best known for his book Destructieve relaties op de schop - psychopathie herkennen en hanteren (in Dutch; Dismantling Destructive Relationships - Recognizing and Handling Psychopathy) (1st ed. 2010; 2nd ed. 2014) of which more than 30,000 copies have been sold. He gives lectures, courses and training and provides intervision and advice for professionals in (mental) health care, for lawyers and mediators and for people working in the youth protection chain. He gives advice to people who are dealing with a destructive relationship and gives lectures and workshops for these people and their networks. He has performed more than 2,000 family analyses.

Training
Jan Storms' academic study had 'consciousness' as its core subject. He studied psychology, pedagogy, logic, critical assessment of sources (historical criticism) and philosophy of science with a focus on research design at the university level. The study of consciousness is considered a 'first science', the science of knowing, the foundation for all knowledge. His study of the theory of knowledge and its implications for the practice of science and for practical everyday life have proved valuable for his work in the field of psychopathy.

Contribution to research into psychopathy
The history of views on psychopathy is variegated. There was a time when the term 'pychopathies' was used for what are now called personality disorders. The American psychiatrist Hervey Cleckley and - based on Cleckley's study - the Canadian criminologist Robert Hare, described psychopathy as a self-contained disorder. It is widely accepted that psychopathy is characterized by a lack of conscience (self-reflection) and empathy. A characteristic of the various psychopathy constructs is that the criteria for psychopathy are a mixture of essential and non-essential characteristics. The contribution of Jan Storms is that in his formulation of a psychopathy construct he has made a strict separation between core characteristics (necessary and sufficient) and secondary characteristics (non-essential and possibly not sufficient).

The function and risks of loyalty, acceptance and rejection in family relationships
Jan Storms is an expert in the field of (parental) alienation. He gives training to professionals and to parents and family who have to deal with this. He is trained in recognising and differentiating the different forms of alienation and justified rejection (for the sake of protection). He is also an expert in the field of the psychological problems which are often the underlying cause of alienation.

Contact


First Name

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Last Name

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Email

This field is required

Type your input data here

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Disclaimer


De gedachten zijn vrij.
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